I-66 Information
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U.S. Government Information Report March 2000

The 1991 Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act (ISTEA) identified several high priority corridors on the National Highway System. The East-West Transamerica Corridor (I-66) was one of these high priority corridors, and funding was provided for a feasibility study. The East-West Transamerica Corridor was generally defined as a corridor located between 1-70 and l-40 with an eastern terminus in Virginia and a western terminus in southern California. Based on the Appropriations Act, the corridor in Kentucky is to be centered on the cities of Bowling Green, Columbia, Somerset, London, Hazard, Jenkins and Pikeville.

    In 1992, consultants Wilbur Smith Associates (WSA) and Howard Needles Tammen and Bergendoff (HNTB) were selected to conduct a national East-West Transamerica Corridor Feasibility Study. A Steering Committee consisting of representatives of eleven states and the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) provided technical direction to the study while the Missouri Highway and Transportation Department served as administrative agent. This study, titled the "Transamerica Transportation Corridor Feasibility Study," was completed in 1994. While this study concluded that the entire coast-to-coast corridor did not meet the economic feasibility criteria established for the study, it did conclude that further analysis could find some segments of the corridor more feasible from a state or regional perspective.

    In 1997, the Kentucky Transportation Center completed a study for the Transportation Cabinet that concluded that the Southern Kentucky Corridor (1-66) through Kentucky was indeed feasible. This study included public participation through an advisory committee, public meetings, press releases, and newsletters sent to all parties who expressed an interest in the project. This study identified the Somerset to London segment of the 1-66 corridor as a priority segment. Additionally, the Transportation Equity Act for the 21" Century (TEA-21) also established funding for the Somerset to London segment of the l-66 corridor as a high priority corridor.

    In late 1998, a planning study was initiated utilizing the consultant services of Wilbur Smith Associates, to identify a preferred corridor for I-66 between Somerset in Pulaski County and London in Laurel County. Preliminary corridor alternates were presented at public meetings in Somerset and London in June 1999. Based on comments received during and after those meetings, the Transportation Cabinet has been working with Wilbur Smith Associates to determine the impacts of constructing I-66 along the existing KY 80 corridor or in other locations close to KY 80. More in-depth analysis has been completed for all alternates being considered and all of this information will be presented at public meetings scheduled for March 2000 in Somerset and London.

CORRIDOR EVALUATION

    Most recently, ten corridor alternates have been evaluated for the I-66 corridor using three criteria categories: traffic and socioeconomic issues; environmental issues; and cost estimates. Each of these criteria are described in the following sections and presented in table format on the following pages.

Traffic 8 Socioeconomic Issues

A total of eleven (11) traffic and socioeconomic issues are considered for this analysis. The evaluation categories include:

Projected Traffic Volumes The weighted (based on segment length) average annual daily traffic (AADT) for each alternate alignment in the Design Year 2030.

Time Savings The total travel time saved on a one-way trip along each alternate alignment (at 65 mph) when compared with travel along the existing KY 80.

Distance Savings The total travel distance saved on a one-way trip along each alternate alignment when compared with travel along the existing KY 80,

Daily Vehicle Miles of Travel (VMT) Served The total number of vehicle-miles (segment length x segment AADT) traveled along each alternate alignment by Year 2030.

Daily Vehicle Hours of Travel (VHT) Saved The total number of vehicle-hours (time savings x daily VMT) saved by each alternate alignment by Year 2030.

Accident Reductions The total number of accidents (reduction factor’ x daily VMT) that would be eliminated by each alternate alignment by Year 2030.

System Connectivity A measure of access to other highway facilities for each alternate alignment (number of intersections proposed for each alternate x the functional classification of the intersected route). Ratings range from nine (9) for a Rural Interstate to one (1) for a County Road.

Displacements The number of structures displaced for each proposed alternate alignment (within a 500’ corridor zone).

Recreational Facilities The average distance (in miles) from each alternate alignment to 116 recreational facilities in a five-county area.

Industrial Serviceability The average distance (in miles) from each alternate alignment to 203 industrial facilities in the study area.

Environmental Justice A percentage calculated to measure minorities, elderly persons, and low-income persons along the identified alignments. Values above zero (0) indicate the alignment is more favorable than the regional average, potentially causing fewer negative impacts to these population groups.

Environmental Issues

A total of fifteen (15) environmental issues are considered. Numbers within the environmental tables represent potential impacts within a 2,000-foot corridor for each identified alternate

Archaeology Sites The number of known sites located in a 2,000-foot corridor.

Cemeteries The number of known sites located in a 2,000-foot corridor.

Churches The number of known sites located in a 2,000-foot corridor.

Historic Structures The number of known sites located in a 2,000-foot corridor.

Schools The number of known sites located in a 2,000-foot corridor.

Daniel Boone National Forest (DBNF) Property The number of acres of property owned by the DBNF located within a 2,000-foot corridor.

Threatened 8 Endangered Species The number of known sites located in a 2,000-foot corridor (State & Federal data).

Potential Threatened B Endangered Species The number of sites located in a 2,000-foot corridor.

Cave Routes The number of feet located within a 2,000-foot corridor.

Clifflines The number of feet located within a 2,000-foot corridor.

Stream Crossings The number of blue-line stream crossings within a 2,000-foot corridor.

Wetland Sites The number of known acres located in a 2,000-foot corridor.

Wild River The potential for a 2,000-foot corridor to pass through a designated Wild River Area (0 = no, 1 = yes).

Oil 8 Gas Wells The number of known sites in a 2,000-foot corridor (includes known abandoned sites).

Hazardous Sites The number of Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Underground Storage Tank (UST) sites located within a 2,000-foot corridor.

Cost Estimates

A number of construction-related issues are considered when estimating costs for the identified corridor alternates. These elements are combined to present Total and Per-Mile Costs for each alternate:

Planning and Design

Environmental Factors

Right-of-way Acquisition

Utility Installation or Relocation

Construction Elements Includes earthwork, excavation, pavement materials, drainage and bridge structures, interchanges, and other costs.

Southern Kentucky Corridor
Preliminary Traffic/Socioeconomic Overview
Design Year = 2030

* Key Traffic/Socioeconomic Features *

Alternate Projected
Traffic
Volumes
Time
Savings
Distance
Savings
Daily VMT
Served

Daily VHT
Served

Accident
Re-

ductions

System
Con-

nectivity

Displace-
ments

Rec-
reational
Facilities

Industrial
Service-
ability

Environ-
mental
Justice

  VPD M:S Miles VMT VHT Number Rating Number Miles Miles Percent
KY 80 20,300 11:00 3.7 936,000 3720 480 57 480 36.0 5.2 23
North No.1 20,400 11:30 4.1 930,000 3890 480 51 300 33.1 5.6 30
North No.2 14,600 10:50 3.4 674,000 2560 350 56 240 36.3 5.7 13
North No.3 18,500 12:00 4.6 834,000 3730 430 54 270 36.1 5.7 15
North No.4 19,900 10:30 3.1 932,000 3470 480 51 330 31.8 5.7 29
Middle 15,500 11:20 4.0 707,000 2920 370 49 140 32.5 5.4 23
South No.1 15,800 8:20 0.7 774,000 2180 400 53 300 27.7 5.9 15
South No.2 15,500 7:30 -0.2 775,000 1920 400 53 280 27.7 6.2 14
South No.3 15,000 8:20 0.8 736,000 2110 380 55 380 27.8 6.6 17
South No.4 16,600 7:50 0.2 820,000 2160 420 53 310 27.9 5.4 16
BEST WORST

Southern Kentucky Corridor
Preliminary Environmental Overview

* Key Environmental Features (within a 2,000-foot buffer) *

Alternate Archaeology
Sites
Cemeteries Churches Historic
Structures

Schools

DBNF
Property

Threatened & Endangered
Species

Potential
Threatened &
Endangered
Species

  Each Each Each Each Each Acres Each Each
KY 80 30 9 4 7 5 750 9 1
North No.1 21 8 13 1 6 1,240 2 2
North No.2 16 4 7 1 0 740 0 0
North No.3 22 4 8 1 3 720 2 1
North No.4 26 6 9 1 4 1,550 2 1
Middle 9 5 3 1 0 1,990 16 16
South No.1 6 7 8 1 4 1,570 14 23
South No.2 6 6 11 1 5 1,570 16 23
South No.3 10 9 7 1 2 1,520 7 22
South No.4 6 9 10 1 4 1,570 14 23
BEST WORST

Southern Kentucky Corridor
Preliminary Environmental Overview (continued)

* Key Environmental Features (within a 2,000-foot buffer) *

Alternate Cave
Routes
Clifflines Stream
Crossings
Wetland
Sites

"Wild"
River

Oil & Gas Wells 1

Hazardous
Sites
(EPA & UST's) 2

  Feet Feet Each Acres Each Each Each
KY 80 5,740 30,070 43 50 1 28 17
North No.1 0 46,660 41 101 1 20 5
North No.2 0 41,150 52 87 0 19 0
North No.3 0 35,240 48 93 1 20 0
North No.4 0 35,860 53 90 1 23 0
Middle 3,250 100,260 51 70 1 24 4
South No.1 6,980 100,600 63 110 0 19 0
South No.2 6,980 100,600 58 110 0 19 0
South No.3 11,600 113,350 69 220 0 3 0
South No.4 6,980 100,600 57 90 0 19 4
BEST WORST

1 Includes abandoned sites.   2 Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Underground                                                    Storage Tank (UST) sites.

Southern Kentucky Corridor
Preliminary Environmental Overview (continued)

* Key Environmental Features (within a 2,000-foot buffer) *

Alternate Length1 Construction Bridges 2 Interchanges 3

Design

Right-of-Way
& Utilities

Project

Per Mile
  Miles (millions) (millions) (millions) (millions) (millions) (millions) (millions)
KY 80 No.1 4 38.4 $   308.1 $   103.0 $   121.4 $   116.8 $   519.1 $   1,168.4 $   30.5
KY 80 No.2 5 38.4 $   564.0 $   103.0 $   121.4 $   117.6 $   269.7 $   1,175.7 $   30.7
North No.1 39.0 $   387.5 $   88.4 $   121.4 $   88.7 $   200.9 $   886.9 $   22.7
North No.2 41.5 $   412.2 $   84.0 $   136.4 $   94.3 $   215.9 $   942.8 $   22.7
North No.3 40.1 $   398.5 $   84.0 $   136.4 $   92.2 $   210.7 $   921.8 $   23.0
North No.4 43.2 $   429.7 $   86.2 $   121.4 $   94.9 $   217.1 $   949.3 $   22.0
Middle 39.1 $   388.4 $   88.4 $   108.2 $   86.8 $   196.2 $   868.0 $   22.2
South No.1 45.6 $   443.9 $   99.4 $   114.8 $   97.6 $   220.7 $   976.4 $   21.4
South No.2 46.5 $   461.9 $   92.8 $   114.8 $   99.6 $   227.3 $   996.4 $   21.4
South No.3 48.9 $   486.3 $   148.5 $   121.4 $   111.0 $   242.5 $   1,109.7 $   22.7
South No.4 42.9 $   426.2 $   95.0 $   114.8 $   94.4 $   213.6 $   944.0 $   22.0
BEST WORST
1 Miles   2 Includes Overpasses and Railroad Structures  3 Includes One Rest Area per Alternate
4 Includes Purchase of 1798 Parcels @ $155,000 Each & No Frontage Roads
5 Includes Approximately 52.2 Miles of Frontage Roads
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